Stayed In Mississippi A Day Too Long (Interview with Mississippi Bones) …   Leave a comment

Facebook Bio – Two dudes from the flat lands of Hardin county, Ohio making rock n roll the way it was intended. From foot tappin’ groove rock to southern swamp sludge, Mississippi Bones takes you on a trip you won’t soon forget. Littered with huge riffs and lyrics smeared with pop culture references, this beast will wrap itself around you and not let go any time soon!

Dr.D.: Congratulations for the album. All reviews I‘ve read are really positive! Did you expect this kind of success?
D.: Thanks! Since this was our first release, we didn’t really know what to expect. We were really happy with the finished product and have been pleasantly surprised by all the positive feedback. We can’t thank everyone enough for getting behind Mississippi Bones.

Dr.D.: Let me ask a weird question right away. They say you have all the time in the world to write your first album but very little for your second! Do you feel any pressure now, to stand up to people’s expectations?
D.: We don’t really feel any pressure. Obviously we hope our second record is as successful as our first, but at the end of the day, the only expectations we feel we need to live up to are our own. We’ve set pretty high standards for ourselves, so if we create something that we can be proud of, I think in the end, everyone will be satisfied.

Dr.D.: Can you give some info about the band? Are you still a duo? Have you or are you planning to expand with additional members?
D.: At its core, Mississippi Bones is Jared and I. We do all the writing and performing on the record and we have no plans for that to change in the future. That being said, we’ve recently hooked up with some friends who play and we plan to play a show or two in 2011. We’ll post all the information on the upcoming shows on our Facebook page once things are set in stone.

Dr.D.: Did you use session drummer during recordings or was it a drum machine?
D.: We actually used a midi program called “Stephen Slate Drums” on the record. In our opinion, it has the most realistic drum sound of any program we’ve worked with.

Dr.D.: The song “Do android dream of electric sheep” is based on the novel with the same name by P.K. Dick. In this specific song you reveal the most southern influences of band. Do you find a connection between southern rock and science fiction? Don’t you think it’s a little bit unusual?
D.: It may be a bit unusual, but we were very pleased with how “Androids” turned out, so I think the marriage of the two worked well. If you look at the history of rock, science fiction has been subject fodder for bands ranging from Black Sabbath to Rush, so I don’t think joining the two was that big of a stretch. I think in the end, it all boils down to presentation. If you’re working with an unusual subject, as long as you don’t make the song sound cheesy, I think most times you can pull it off.

Dr.D.: How does Mississippi inspire you to create music?
D.: The ironic thing is that I’ve never stepped foot in the state of Mississippi. I got the name for the band from an article I read a few years back on an outlaw group of hobos riding the rails of America, killing people and raising hell. One of the hobos in the article called himself “Mississippi Bones” and I thought that was a great name for a band. When the opportunity presented itself, the name fit the music I was writing perfectly.

Dr.D.: Have you realized that lately more and more bands build their sound on southern rock riffs? Have you adopted this style because you wanted be part of this movement or did it just happen naturally?
D.: It definitely happened naturally. Growing up, my mom always had the radio tuned to the classic rock station, so I got a healthy dose of The Doors, Zeppelin, Sabbath, Neil Young and Skynyrd in my formative years. As I got older, I got into the 90s grunge scene as well as heavier bands like Pantera, Crowbar, White Zombie and COC. I picked up the guitar in the late 90s and taught myself how to play by learning songs by bands like Clutch and Sabbath. I think if you add all those factors together, you get the sum total of the Mississippi Bones sound.

Dr.D.: Who is responsible for the cool cover art?
D.: The cover was designed by an extremely talented graphic designer friend of mine named Brandon Roosa. He has a company called Classicolour and you can find his blog here: http://www.tryclassic.com

Dr.D.: I got the feeling that the atmosphere on the album was quite loose almost as if you were having too much fun! Do you allow room for improvising/jamming when you are on studio?
D.: We actually don’t do much improvisation in the studio. I think the only song we changed while we were tracking was “The Silverforked Tongue of Mr. Toad.” Considering it’s just the two of us, our writing process normally starts with me writing and demoing a song in my home studio. I give the track to Jared so he can write lyrics. At that point, we begin to bounce ideas off each other. Changing a part here, shortening a part there, etc. By the time we get into the studio, we’ve got the songs exactly the way we want them, so tracking doesn’t take much time at all. I think we’re able to maintain that loose, “jamming” type vibe because we’re having a blast, doing something we both love.

Dr.D.: Before we finish the interview please give us some information about the plans of the band in 2011.
D.: Well, we have several things in store for Mississippi Bones this year. We plan to record and release our follow up record. We’ve been writing and demoing songs over the last few months and we’re both really excited to get back in the studio and get them recorded. And as I mentioned before, we plan to play a show or two in 2011, so we’re really excited about that as well. Keep an eye on our Facebook page because that’s where I’ll post all the information about the upcoming shows and the progress on our second record.
Interview By Dr.Doom Metal ( Dr.Dooms Lair )
Mississippi Bones @ Bandcamp
Mississippi Bones @ Facebook

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Posted March 3, 2011 by doommantia in Mississippi Bones

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